Transcript: Breville - toasting its competitors when it comes to IP

Last updated: 
19 March 2016

Richard Hoare – Design & Innovation Director, Breville

We believe that to be competitive these days you can’t just do something okay, if you want a business to be competitive in the long run then you need a sustainable competitive advantage. So we have to do something different I think for a start it has to be something the consumer wants but it also has to be something that we can keep doing for many years.

What we do is we focus on the kitchen and on what people are trying to make in their kitchen and we believe that that’s an area that’s very important to people because we’re talking about the health of peoples family. Their ability to provide for their family and friends to entertain them and really it’s a way that people share and express their love as well.

So we use that as an overriding direction to help us decide consistently with different products and different product families how we’re going to apply for Patents, for registered Designs and for Trade Marks. But that’s only one aspect and another is we certainly don’t want to accidently tread on anyone else’s toes to accidently infringe anyone else’s IP because that’s certainly something we don’t want to do as it’s a very expensive process if you know if you failed to achieving that.

I think if the first piece of advice would give is do your own research and find out what’s out there a lot of people approach me with an idea that 30 seconds 'googling' can find a whole lot of history and background on and you may learn that’s an idea that’s been out there since the thirty’s or you might learn that hey it seems to be really unique.

But doing your own research really helps to start with then I would say it’s so important to engage a professional because there’s nothing more traumatic than having a piece of Intellectual Property that is registered but hasn’t been worded correctly hasn’t been structured correctly and therefore doesn’t give you the protection that your due and the worlds full of stories of pieces of Intellectual Property that have failed when they were tested in court because of a minor technicality.

And that’s such a shame I think that the thing I really hate is seeing the industry is an inventor that’s come up with an amazing new thing and put years of their life into it, only to have someone else use it and they haven’t been able to enforce their Intellectual Property.

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